Category: Board of Selectmen

Opinion: Cost no Obstacle in Selectmen’s Waste Disposal Choice

The Selectmen’s recent decision to pursue only one option for the Town’s trash and recycling contract cast cost, environmental impact and convenience to the side.

Update2: First They Came for the Farmers: Foodie’s landlord opposes Farmers’ Market

Locatelli is objecting to part of the Town’s municipal lot being given over to the Belmont Farmer’s Market, which has dutifully served the community from that location for 11 years. Apparently, Mr. Foley and his employer banked on public resources (a small number of spaces at the back of the Town’s municipal lot) being there to boost the prospects for his private tenant (and the private property owner) despite an 11 year history. If he made any assurances to Foodies about the Market not being there in 2017 and those spots being opened, he was bargaining with an asset he didn’t own or control – always a risky business.

State Grants Belmont $7.5 Million For New Library – Belmont, MA Patch

Let the great game of Chess begin! As the Patch reported yesterday: the State granted Belmont $7.5 Million to build a new library across Concord Ave from the library’s current location. The grant, for the construction of a 45,000 square foot,…

Town Meeting Live Blog – Night 2

We’re back at Belmont Town meeting and waiting to get going here. This should be an abbreviated meeting, with just three articles to consider: the vote on the Community Preservation Act (Article 21) that the Town approved in November. The…

New Year’s Resolution (or how I learned to stop worrying and love parking meters)

After a hectic year of political races and an (unsuccessful) override vote, I wrapped my brain around a much smaller and more concrete question: could Belmont make money off of multi space parking meters? The answer: hell yeah! Read on for more…and for my New Year’s Resolutions

Belmont: Making Tough Choices

Like all of us who live or work in Belmont, I’m sure you’ve noticed that our Town is facing difficult times: a budget shortfall, a fragmentation of our civil discourse and a waning of trust in local government. This isn’t the first time this has happened, of course, but in many ways the challenges are new. So, just as New England towns have done for centuries, Belmont is convening a meeting in October to begin to sort out, together, how we can best address those challenges. And we invite you to attend.